Video Print

Sitting in a course team meeting of 6 for over 3 hours today (err, yesterday…) discussing second drafts of print material for a course unit that will be delivered for the first time in March 2010 (third drafts are due mid-December this year), it struck me that we were so missing the point as the discussion turned to how best to accommodate a reference from print material to a possible short video asset in such a way that a student reading the written print material might actually refer to the video in a timely way…

Maybe it’s because the topic was mobile telephony, but it struck me that the obvious way to get students reading print material to watch a video at the appropriate point in the text would be to use something like this:

By placing something like a QR code in the margin text at the point you want the reader to watch the video, you can provide an easy way of grabbing the video URL, and let the reader use a device that’s likely to be at hand to view the video with…

I have to admit the phrase “blended learning” has to date been largely meaningless to me… But this feels like the sort of thing I’d expect it to be… For example:

Jane is sitting at the table, reading a study block on whatever, her mobile phone on the table at her side. As she works through the material, she annotates the text, underlining key words and phrases, making additional notes in the margin. At a certain point in the text, she comes across a prompt to watch a short video to illustrate a point made in the previous paragraph. She had hoped not to have to use her PC in this study session – it’s such a hassle going upstairs to the study to turn it on… Maybe she’ll watch the video next time she logs in to the VLE (if she remembers…). Of course, life’s not like that now. She picks up her phone, takes a picture of the QR code in the margin, and places her phone back on the table, next to the study guide. The video starts, and she takes more notes as it plays…

Thinking about it, here’s another possibility:

Jim is in lean back mode, laying on the sofa, feet up, skimming through this week’s study guide. The course DVD is in the player. As he reads through the first section, there’s a prompt to watch an explanatory video clip. He could snap the QR code in the margin and watch the video on his phone, but as the course DVD is all cued up, it’s easy enough to select the block menu, and click on the appropriate clip’s menu item. Of course, it’d be just as easy to use the Wii connected to the TV to browse to the course’s Youtube page and watch the clips that way, but hey, the DVD video quality is much better…

This is quite an old OU delivery model – for years we expected students to record TV programmes broadcast in the early hours of the morning, or we’d send them video cassettes. But as video delivery has got easier, and the short form (2-3 minute video clip) has gained more currency, I get the feeling we’ve been moving away from the use of video media because it’s so expensive to produce and so inconvenient to watch…

4 comments

  1. Owen Stephens

    Keep thinking that QR and similar have a great deal of potential, but still not seeing much use in the UK generally – does this mean that everyone is missing a trick, or that the benefits are generally too small for users to bother installing custom s/w and understand the concept?

  2. Pingback: Printing Out Online Course Materials With Embedded Movie Links « OUseful.Info, the blog…
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  4. Augusta Attorneys

    This is a very interesting post. I recently read a similar article. In response to Owen Stephens, I personally think a great deal of people are missing the boat on this. Keep up the great work.