OUseful.Info, the blog…

Trying to find useful things to do with emerging technologies in open education

Inter-Council Payments and the Google Fusion Tables Network Graph

One of the great things about aggregating local spending data from different councils in the same place – such as on OpenlyLocal – is that you can start to explore structural relations in the way different public bodies of a similar type spend money with each other.

On the local spend with corporates scraper on Scraperwiki, which I set up to scrape how different councils spent money with particular suppliers, I realised I could also use the scraper to search for how councils spent money with other councils, by searching for suppliers containing phrases such as “district council” or “town council”. (We could also generate views to to see how councils wre spending money with different police authorities, for example.)

(The OpenlyLocal API doesn’t seem to work with the search, so I scraped the search results HTML pages instead. Results are paged, with 30 results per page, and what seems like a maximum of 1500 (50 pages) of results possible.)

The publicmesh table on the scraper captures spend going to a range of councils (not parish councils) from other councils. I also uploaded the data to Google Fusion tables (public mesh spending data), and then started to explore it using the new network graph view (via the Experiment menu). So for example, we can get a quick view over how the various county councils make payments to each other:

Hovering over a node highlights the other nodes its connected to (though it would be good if the text labels from the connected nodes were highlighted and labels for unconnected nodes were greyed out?)

(I think a Graphviz visualisation would actually be better, eg using Canviz, because it can clearly show edges from A to B as well as B to A…)

As with many exploratory visualisations, this view helps us identify some more specific questions we might want to ask of the data, rather than presenting a “finished product”.

As well as the experimental network graph view, I also noticed there’s a new Experimental View for Google Fusion Tables. As well as the normal tabular view, we also get a record view, and (where geo data is identified?) a map view:

What I’d quite like to see is a merging of map and network graph views…

One thing I noticed whilst playing with Google Fusion Tables is that getting different aggregate views is rather clunky and relies on column order in the table. So for example, here’s an aggregated view of how different county councils supply other councils:

In order to aggregate by supplied council, we need to reorder the columns (the aggregate view aggregates columns as thet appear from left to right in the table view). From the Edit column, Modify Table:

(In my browser, I then had to reload the page for the updated schema to be reflected in the view). Then we can get the count aggregation:

It would be so much easier if the aggregation view allowed you to order the columns there…

PS no time to blog this properly right now, but there are a couple of new javascript libraries that are worth mentioning in the datawrangling context.

In part coming out of the Guardian stable, Misoproject is “an open source toolkit designed to expedite the creation of high-quality interactive storytelling and data visualisation content”. The initial dataset library provides a set of routines for: loading data into the browser from a variety of sources (CSV, Google spreadsheets, JSON), including regular polling; creating and managing data tables and views of those tables within the browser, including column operations such as grouping, statistical operations (min, max, mean, moving average etc); playing nicely with a variety of client side graphics libraries (eg d3.js, Highcharts, Rickshaw and other JQuery graphics plugins).

Recline.js is a library from Max Ogden and the Open Knowledge Foundation that if its name is anything to go by is positioning itself as an alternative (or complement?) to Google Refine. To my mind though, it’s more akin to a Google Fusion Tables style user interface (“classic” version) wherever you need it, via a Javascript library. The data explorer allows you to import and preview CSV, Excel, Google Spreadsheet and ElasticSearch data from a URL, as well as via file upload (so for example, you can try it with the public spend mesh data CSV from Scraperwiki). Data can be sorted, filtered and viewed by facet, and there’s a set of integrated graphical tools for previewing and displaying data too. Refine.js views can also be shared and embedded, which makes this an ideal tool for data publishers to embed in their sites as a way of facilitating engagement with data on-site, as I expect we’ll see on the Data Hub before too long.

More reviews of these two libraries later…

PPS These are also worth a look in respect of generating visualisations based on data stored in Google spreadsheets: DataWrapper and Freedive (like my old Guardian Datastore explorer, but done properly… Wizard led UI that helps you create your own searchable and embeddable database view direct from a Google Spreadsheet).

Written by Tony Hirst

May 21, 2012 at 9:25 am

2 Responses

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  1. [...] the local spend on corporates scraper I used to produce Inter-Council Payments Network Graph, I grabbed details of payments to companies returned by a search on OpenlyLocal for suppliers [...]

  2. [...] Inter-Council Payments and the Google Fusion Tables Network Graph, I demonstrated a recipe for graphing the extent to which county councils made payments to each [...]


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