My Arcadia Project Review (Presentation)

Today was another of those days when I rambled aloud, and in public…

Thanks for turning up, folks…. apols for not leaving much time at the end for discussion…

Author: Tony Hirst

I'm a Senior Lecturer at The Open University, with an interest in #opendata policy and practice, as well as general web tinkering...

4 thoughts on “My Arcadia Project Review (Presentation)”

    1. I created the original text filled grid (a 3×2 table), copied it 6 times and deleted 5 different text comments on each. next step was to merge some cells and put in resized photos to complete each slide, duplicate filled slides and delete images as required.

      (This reply created using WordPress app on android phone.)

    2. There’s a little backstory to the grid as well:

      1) I’d been reading Presentation Zen (the book) again, and was mulling over the layout/presentation of Japanese lunch boxes;

      2) I’ve been thinking for some time about designing slides for multi screen displays like the one in slide 2 which is in one of the new OU buildings;

      3) I’d been pondering what might be a different way of representing bullet points, yet still getting several points onto a slide

      4) I was looking for a new way of doing slides that would be a little more, err, artistic than my normal effort

      5) i still haven;t cracked the problem that my slides are useless as after-the-fact documentation of the talk

      Driving up to MK on the way to give the talk yesterday, I found that the way the slides were composed worked as a memory palace/mnemonic. That is, I could go through the 18 or so points raised by the images from memory…

  1. I was lucky enough to view the slides first hand at the presentation. They worked well and gave quite a good flow to it. It told a good story. A couple of the images a bit small but worked OK in the small room.

    Interestingly I’ve seen 2 presentations this week with innovative techniques. David Bainbridge’s Greenstone talk in KMI on Thursday used ‘Realistic Book software’ with turning pages on a book to display the presentation.

    Looking forward to a follow up with library staff

Comments are closed.