Some Idle Thoughts on Managing Temporal Posts in WordPress

Now that I’ve got a couple of my own WordPress blogs running off the back of my Reclaim Hosting account, I’ve started to look again at possible ways of tinkering with WordPress.

The first thing I had a look at was posting a draft WordPress post from a script.

Using a WordPress role editor plugin (e.g. a long the lines of this User Role Editor) it’s easy enough to create a new role with edit and upload permissions only [WordPress roles and capabilities], and create a new ‘autoposter’ user with that role. Code like the following then makes it easy enough to upload an image to WordPress, grab the URL, insert it into a post, and then submit the post – where it will, by default, appear as a draft post:

#Ish Via: http://python-wordpress-xmlrpc.readthedocs.org/en/latest/examples/media.html
from wordpress_xmlrpc import Client, WordPressPost
from wordpress_xmlrpc.compat import xmlrpc_client
from wordpress_xmlrpc.methods import media, posts
from wordpress_xmlrpc.methods.posts import NewPost

wp = Client('http://blog.example.org/xmlrpc.php', ACCOUNTNAME, ACCOUNT_PASSWORD)

def wp_simplePost(client,title='ping',content='pong, <em>pong<em>'):
    post = WordPressPost()
    post.title = title
    post.content = content
    response = client.call(NewPost(post))
    return response

def wp_uploadImageFile(client,filename):

    #mimemap
    mimes={'png':'image/png', 'jpg':'image/jpeg'}
    mimetype=mimes[filename.split('.')[-1]]
    
    # prepare metadata
    data = {
            'name': filename,
            'type': mimetype,  # mimetype
    }

    # read the binary file and let the XMLRPC library encode it into base64
    with open(filename, 'rb') as img:
            data['bits'] = xmlrpc_client.Binary(img.read())

    response = client.call(media.UploadFile(data))
    return response

def quickTest():
    txt = "Hello World"
    txt=txt+'<img src="{}"/><br/>'.format(wp_uploadImageFile(wp,'hello2world.png')['url'])
    return txt

quickTest()

Dabbling with this then got me thinking about the different sorts of things that WordPress allows you to publish in general. It seems to me that there are essentially three main types of thing you can publish:

  1. posts: the timestamped elements that appear in a reverse chronological order in a WordPress blog. Posts can also be tagged and categorised and viewed via a tag or category page. Posts can be ‘persisted’ at the top of the posts page by setting them as a “sticky” post.
  2. pages: static content pages typically used to contain persistent, unchanging content. For example, an “About” page. Pages can also be organised hierarchically, with child subpages defined relative to a specified ‘parent’ page.
  3. sidebar elements and widgets: these can contain static or dynamic content.

(By the by, a range of third party plugins appear to support the conversion of posts to pages, for example Post Type Switcher [untested] or the bulk converter Convert Post Types [untested].)

Within a page or a post, we can also include a shortcode element that can be used to include a small piece of templated text or generated from the execution of some custom code (which it seems could be python: running a python script from a WordPress shortcode). Shortcodes run each time a page is loaded, although you can use the WordPress Transients database API to implement a simple cache for them to improve performance (eg as described here and here).

Within a post, page or widget, we can also embed dynamic content. For example, we could embed a map that displays dynamically created markers that are essentially out of the control of the page or post publisher. Note that by default WordPress strips iframes from content (and it also seems reluctant to allow the upload of html files to the media gallery, at least by default). The preferred way to include custom embedded content seems to be to define a shortcode to embed the required content, although there are plugins around that allow you to embed iframes. (I didn’t spot one that let you inline the content of the iframe using srcdoc though?)

When we put together the Isle of Wight planning applications : Mapped page, one of the issues related to how updates to the map should be posted over time.

Isle_of_Wight_planning_applications___Mapped

That is, should the map be uploaded to a fixed page and show only the most recent data, should it be posted as a timestamped post, to provide archival copies of the page, or should it be posted to a page and support a timeslider/history function?

Thinking about this again, the distinction seems to rely on what sort of (re)discovery we want to encourage or support. For example, if the page is a destination page, then we should probably use a page with a fixed URL for the most recent map. Older maps could be accessed via archive links, or perhaps subpages, if a time-filter wasn’t available on a single map view. Alternatively, we might want to alert readers to the map, in which case it might make more sense to use a timestamped post. (We could of course use a post to announce an update to the page, perhaps including a screenshot of the latest map in the post.)

It also strikes me that we need to consider publication schedules by a news outlet compared to the publication schedules associated with a particular dataset.

For example, Land Registry House Prices Paid data is published on a monthly basis a few weeks after each month the data has been collected for. In this case, it probably makes sense to publish on a monthly basis.

But what about care home or food outlet inspection data? The CQC publish data as it becomes available, although searches support the retrieval of data for a particular area published over the last week or last month relative the time the search is made. The Food Standards Agency produce updates to data download files on a daily basis, but the file for any particular area is only updated when it contains new data. (So on any given day, you don’t know which, if any, area files will be updated.)

In this case, it may well be that a news outlet may want to do a couple of things:

  • publish summaries of reports over the last week or last month, on a weekly or monthly schedule – “The CQC published reports for N care homes in the region over the last month, of which X were positive and Y were negative”, etc.
  • engage in a more immediate or responsive publication of stories around particular reports as they are published by the responsible agency. In this case, the journalist needs to find a way of discovering stories in a timely fashion, either through signing up to alerts or inspecting the agency site on a regular basis.

Again, it might be that we can use posts and pages in complementary way: pages that act as fixed destination sites with a fixed URL, and perhaps links off to archived historical sub-pages, as well as related news stories, that contain the latest summary; and posts that announce timely reports as well as ‘page updated’ announcements when the slower-changing page is updated.

More abstractly, it probably makes sense to consider the relative frequencies with which data is originally published (also considering whether the data is published according to a fixed schedule, or in a more responsive way as and when data becomes available), the frequency with which journalists check the data site, and the frequency with which journalists actually publish data related stories.

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