Printing Out Online Course Materials With Embedded Movie Links

Although an increasing number of OU courses include the delivery of online course materials, written for online delivery as linked HTML pages, rather than just as print documents viewable online, we know (anecdotally at least, from requests that printing options be made available to print off whole sections of a course with a single click) that many students want to be able to print off the materials… (I’m not sure we know why they want to print off the materials, though?)

Reading through a couple of posts that linked to my post on Video Print (Finding problems for QR tags to solve and Quite Resourceful?) I started to ponder a little bit more about a demonstrable use case that we could try out in a real OU course context over a short period of time, prompted by the following couple of comments. Firstly:

So, QR codes – what are they good for? There’s clearly some interest – I mentioned what I was doing on Twitter and got quite a bit of interest. But it’s still rare to come across QR codes in the wild. I see them occasionally on blogs/web-pages but I just don’t much see the point of that (except to allow people like me to experiment). I see QR codes as an interim technology, but a potentially useful one, which bridges the gap between paper-based and digital information. So long as paper documents are an important aspect of our lives (no sign of that paper-less office yet) then this would seem to be potentially useful.
[Paul Walk: Quite Resourceful?]

And secondly:

There’s a great idea in this blog post, Video Print:

By placing something like a QR code in the margin text at the point you want the reader to watch the video, you can provide an easy way of grabbing the video URL, and let the reader use a device that’s likely to be at hand to view the video with…

I would use this a lot myself – my laptop usually lives on my desk, but that’s not where I tend to read print media, so in the past I’ve ripped URLs out of articles or taken a photo on my phone to remind myself to look at them later, but I never get around to it. But since I always have my phone with me I’d happily snap a QR code (the Nokia barcode software is usually hidden a few menus down, but it’s worth digging out because it works incredibly well and makes a cool noise when it snaps onto a tag) and use the home wifi connection to view a video or an extended text online.

As a ‘call to action’ a QR tag may work better than a printed URL because it saves typing in a URL on a mobile keyboard.
[Mia Rdige: Finding problems for QR tags to solve]

And the hopefully practical idea I came up with was this: in the print option of our online courses that embed audio and/or video, design a stylesheet for the print version of the page that will add a QR code that encodes a link to the audio or video asset in the margin of the print out or alongside a holding image for each media asset. In the resources area of the course, provide an explanation of QR codes, maybe with a short video showing how they are used, and links (where possible) to QR reader tools for the most popular mobile devices.

So for example, here is a partial screenshot of material taken from T184 Robotics and the Meaning of Life (the printout looks similar):

And here’s what a trivial change to the stylesheet might produce:

The QR code was generated using the Kaywa QR-code generator – just add a URL as a variable to the generator service URL, and a QR code image appears :-)

Here’s what the image embed code looks like (the link is to the T184 page on the courses and qualifications website – in practice, it would be to the video itself):

<img src=”http://qrcode.kaywa.com/img.php?s=6&d=http%3A%2F%2Fwww3.open.ac.uk%2Fcourses%2Fbin%2Fp12.dll%3FC01t184&#8243; alt=”qrcode” />

Now anyone familiar with OU production processes will know that many of our courses still takes years – that’s right, years – to put together, which makes ‘rapid testing’ rather difficult at times ;-)

But just making a tiny tweak to the stylesheet of the print option in an online course is low risk, and not going to jeopardise quality of course (or a student’s experience of it). But it might add utility to the print out for some students, and it’s a trivial way of starting to explore how we might “mobilise” our materials for mixed online and offline use. And any feedback we get is surely useful for going forwards?

Bung the Common Craft folk a few hundred quid for a “QR codes in Plain English” video and we’re done?

Just to pre-empt the most obvious OU internal “can’t do that because” comment – I know that not everyone prints out the course materials, and I know that not everyone has a mobile phone, and I know that of those that do, not everyone will have a phone that can cope with reading QR codes or playing back movies, and that’s exactly the point

I’m not trying to be equitable in the sense of giving everyone exactly the same experience of exactly the same stuff. Because I’m trying to find ways of providing access to the course materials in a way that’s appropriate to the different ways that students might want to consume them.

As to how we’d know whether anyone was actually using the QR codes – one way might be to add a campaign tracking code onto each QR coded URL, so that at least we’d be able to tell which of the assets were were hosting were being hit from the QR code.

So now here’s a question for OU internal readers. Which “innovation pipeline” should I use to turn the QR code for video assets idea from just an idea into an OU innovation? The CETLs? KMi? IET (maybe their CALRG?) The new Innovation office? LTS Strategic? The Mobile Learning interest group thingy? The Moodle/VLE team? Or shall I just take the normal route of an individual course team member persuading a developer to do it as a favour on a course I’m currently involved with (a non-scalable result in terms of taking the innovation OU -wide, because the unofficial route is an NIH route…!)

And as a supplementary question, how much time should I spend writing up the formal project proposal (CETLs) or business case (LTS Strategic, Innovation Office(?)) etc, and then arguing it through various committees, bearing in mind I’ve spent maybe an hour writing this blog post and the previous one (and also that there’s no more to write – the proof now is in the testing ;-), and it’d take a developer maybe 2 hours to make the stylesheet change and test it?

I just wonder what would happen if any likely candidates for the currently advertised post of e-Learning Developer, in LTS (Learning and Teaching Solutions) were to mention QR codes and how they might be used in answer to a question about how they might “demonstrate a creative but pragmatic approach to delivering the ‘right’ solution within defined project parameters”?! Crash and burn, I suspect!;-)

(NB on the jobs front, the Centre for Professional Learning and Development is also advertising at the moment, in particular for a Interactive Media Developer and a Senior Learning Developer.)

Okay, ranty ramble over, back to the weekend…

PS to link to a sequence that starts so many minutes and seconds in, use the form: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=mfv_hOFT1S4#t=9m49s.

PPS for a good overview of QR codes and mobile phones, see Mobile codes – an easy way to get to the web on your mobile phone.

PPPS [5/2010] Still absolutely no interest in the OU for this sort of thing, but this approach does now appear to be in the wild… Books Come Alive with QR Codes & Data in the Cloud

OU Library Jobs Round-Up (August 2008)

As I feel a flurry of Library related posts coming on, it’s perhaps appropriate to drop the following post in as something I can repeatedly link to over the next week or two (I live in hope that the OUseful.info blog will actually work one day as an OU job ad channel!) – a handful of OU Library jobs:

  • Access to Video Assets Project Manager, The Library and Learning Resource Centre: This is a superb opportunity to join a proactive world class Library service and provide leadership and excellent project management skills for an innovative digitisation project based at The Open University, Milton Keynes. The Access to Video Assets (AVA) project has been funded by The Open University to deliver a searchable collection of broadcast archives material for use in learning, teaching and research.
    You will report to the Learning Resources Development Manager based in The Open University Library and will be responsible for leading a small team consisting of the AVA Project Technical Manager and a Project Administrator to deliver the project’s objectives.
  • Access to Video Assets Technical Project Manager, The Library and Learning Resource Centre: This is a superb opportunity to join a proactive world class Library service and provide excellent technical project management skills for an innovative digitisation project based at The Open University, Milton Keynes. The Access to Video Assets (AVA) project has been funded by The Open University to deliver a searchable collection of broadcast archives material for use in learning, teaching and research.
    You will report directly to the Access to Video Assets Project Manager based in The Open University Library and be responsible for delivering a technical business case, a pilot repository for broadcast archive material and provide key input into a service implementation plan for this significant digitisation project.
  • Digital Libraries Programme Manager: Do you have the vision, creativity and project management skills to lead a programme of digital library developments for 2013?
    We are looking for a dynamic and highly motivated individual with an up to date knowledge of digital library technologies and their potential, rather than hands-on technical expertise, to manage the development of a range of new and exciting services for our students and staff. You will have excellent team working and communication skills and enjoy working with change and challenge.
  • E- Content Advisor, The Library and Learning Resource Centre: The Library’s use of electronic collections is expanding to meet the needs of students and staff for their learning, teaching and research. You will play a key role in developing operational support for the Library’s expanding range of subscriptions and electronic resources as well as co-ordinating the activities associated with purchasing and providing access to electronic content. You will provide support to the strategic development of electronic resources in line with the Library’s aims and objectives.
    A graduate in Librarianship/Information Studies or with equivalent relevant work experience, you will have good working knowledge of issues concerning the acquisition and delivery of electronic and print resources. You will also be able to demonstrate an understanding of technical issues concerning the delivery of electronic content to distance users. A flexible attitude, excellent communication skills, confidence and initiative with the ability to originate solutions are essential.

(I wonder if the video archiving project is DIVA, mark 2?!)

As ever, none of the above posts have anything to do with me…