Rehashing Old Tools to Look at CCK08

I haven’t posted for a few days (nothing to write about, sigh….) so here’s a cheap’n’lazy post reusing a couple of old visual demos (edupunk chatter, More Hyperbolic Tree Visualisations – delicious URL History: Users by Tag) to look at what’s happening around the use of the CCK08 tag that’s being used to annotate – in a distributed way – the Connectivism and Connective Knowledge online course

For example, here’s a view of people who have been using the cck08 tag on delicious:

People twittering mentions of cck08:

And here’s how people have been tagging the Connectivism and Connective Knowledge course homepage on delicious (along with te people who’ve been using those tags).

The next step is to move from hierarchical info displays (such as the above) to mining networks – grous of people who are talking about the same URLs on delicious and twitter, and maybe even blogging about CCK08 too…

Journal Impact Factor Visualisation

Whilst looking around for inspiration for things that could go into a mashup to jazz up the OU repository, I came across the rather wonderful eigenfactor.org which provides an alternative (the “eigenfactor”) to the Thompson Scientific Impact Factor measure of academic journal “weight”.

The site provides a range of graphical tools for exploring the relative impact of journals in a particular discipline, as well as a traditional search box for tracking down a particular journal.

Here’s how we can start to explore the journals in a particular area using an interactive graphical map:

The top journals in the field are listed on the right hand side, and the related fields are displayed within the central panel view.

A motion chart (you know: Hans Rosling; Gapminder…) shows how well particular journals have fared over time:

As well as providing eigenfactor (cf. impact) ratings for several hundred journals, the site also provides a “cost effectiveness” measure that attempts to reconcile a journal’s eigenfactor with it’s cost, giving buyers an idea of how much “bang per buck” their patrons are likely to get from a particular journal (e.g. in terms of how well a particular journal provides access to frequent, highly cited papers in a particular area, given its cost).

Reports are also available for each listed journal:

Finally, if you want to know how eigenfactors are calculated (it’s fun :-), the algorithm is described here: eigenfactor calculation.

More Olympics Medal Table Visualisations

So the Olympics is over, and now’s the time to start exploring various views over the data tables in a leisurely way:-)

A quick scout around shows that the New York Times (of course) have an interactive view of the medals table, also showing a historical dimension:

Channel 4’s interactive table explores medal table ‘normalisation’ according to population, GDP and so on…

GDP and population data have also been taking into account in a couple of visualisations created on Many Eyes – like this one:

Not wanting to not be part of the fun, I spent a bit of time this evening scraping data from the Overall medal standing table and popping it into Many Eyes myself.

(Note that there’s lots of mashable stuff – and some nice URLs – on the http://en.beijing2008.cn/ website… why, oh, why didn’t I think to have a play with it over the last couple of weeks?:-(

Anyway, I’ve uploaded the results, by discipline, for the Olympics 2008 Medal Table (Top 10, by Tally) and had a quick play to see what sort views might be useful in visualising the wealth of information the data contains.

First up, here are the disciplines that the top 10 countries (by medal tally) were excelling at:

Treemaps are one of my favourite visualisation tools. The Many Eyes treemap, whilst not allowing much control over colour palettes, does make it easy to reorder the order of the hierarchy used for the treemap.

Here’s a view by discipline, then country, that allow you to see the relative number of medals awarded by discipline, and the countries that ‘medalled’ within them:

Rearranging the view, we can see how well each country fared in terms of total medal haul, as well as the number of medals in each medal class.

The search tool makes it easy to see medals awarded in a particular discipline by country and medal class – so for example, here’s where the swimming medals went:

A network diagram view lets us see (sort of) another view of the disciplines that each country took medals in.

The matrix chart is more familiar, and shows relative medal hauls for gold, silver and bronze, by country.

By changing the colour display to show the disciplines medals were awarded in, we can see which of the countries won swimming medals, for example.

Enough for now… the data‘s on the Many Eye’s site if you want to create your own visualisations with it… You should be able to reduce the data (e.g. by creating copies of the data set with particular columns omitted) to produce simpler visualisations (e.g. simpler treemaps).

You can also take a copy of the data to use in your own data sets, (e.g. normalising it by GDP, population, etc, etc.)

If you do create any derived visualisations, please post a link back as a comment to this post :-)

Olympic Medal Table Map

Every four years, I get blown away by the dedication of people who have spent the previous four years focussed on their Olympic Challenge (I find it hard to focus for more than an hour or two on any one thing!)

Anyway, I was intrigued to see this post on Google Maps Mania yesterday – Olympic Heat Maps – that displayed the Olympics medal table in the form of a heat map, along with several variants (medal tallies normalised against population, or GDP, for example).

The maps were neat, but static – they’d been derived by cutting and pasting a snapshot of a medals table into a Google spreadsheet, and then creating a Heat Map widget using the data…

Hmmm… ;-)

So I had a look round for a ‘live’ data source for the medals table, didn’t find anything obvious, so looked for a widget that might be pulling on a hidden data source somewhere… Whereupon I found a reference to a WordPress Olympic Medal Tally widget

A quick peek at the code shows the widget pulling on a data feed from the 08:08:08 Olympics blog, so I ‘borrowed’ the feed and some of the widget code to produce a simple HTML table containing the ISO country codes that the Google Heat Map widget requires, linked to it from a Google Spreadsheet (Google Spreadsheets Lets You Import Online Data) and created a live Olympic medal table map (top 10).

If you want to use the heat map as an iGoogle widget, here it is: Olympic Medal Table Map Widget.