Embedding BBC iPlayer Music Videos – Foals

Having a quick look at the new BBC Music and BBC Artist pages that have been getting a lot of mentions this week, I noticed (again?!) that it’s possible to officially embed at least some iPlayer videos now:

So for example, here’s clip of Foals from the BBC Introducing stage at the Bestival last year (I was there, they rocked…. totally…)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

I have to admit, though, that I suspect that if anyone at Ofcom has a visionary moment about the potential of a BBC backed iPlayer, in the context of all the other BBC web content that’s available (including increasing amounts of semantic/linked data, they’re going to come down on the Beeb like a tonne of bricks – though it may be too late by then…

Anyway, if you’re not keeping up with iPlayer plays, here’s a good round up: BBC iPlayer 2.0: Links Roundup.

And if you’re into music, here’s another take on how the beeb sees music on the web: Sound Index. At the moment, the Sound Index artist pages don’t appear to match the BBC music artist pages (e.g. Foals (BBC Sound Index) and Foals (BBC Music, Artist pages, beta), nor does Sound Index use the MusicBrainz artist identifier that the Artist pages do in the URL, but maybe these services will merge in the near future?

If I was in the music biz, particularly the “360” music biz where merchandise and sales around the music (and artist profile/fan pages) is arguably more lucrative than music sales themselves, I’d be getting twitchy… (no ads or clicks-to-buy on the BBC…)

PS I’m going to be offline for a week or two, taking a bit of holiday, and catching up on some reading that’ll probably include BBC Trust – PwC Study into the economic impact of the BBC on the UK, Scoring Points and Making Money!

The Convenience of Embedded, Flash Played, PDFs

Yesterday, my broadband connection went down as BT replaced the telegraph pole that hangs the phone wire to our house, which meant I managed to get a fair bit of reading done, both offline and via a tab sweep.

One of my open tabs contained a ReadWriteWeb Study: Influencers are Alive and Well on Social Media Sites, which reviewed a study form Rubicon Consulting that provides some sort of evidence for the majority of “user generated content” on the web being produced by a small percentage of the users. The post linked to a PDF of the white paper which I assumed (no web connection) I’d have to remember to look up later.

And then – salvation:

The PDF had been embedded in a PDFMENOT Flash player (cf. Scribd etc.), which itself was embedded in the post. So I could read the paper at my leisure without having to connect back to the network.