OpenRefine Style Reconciliation Containers

Over the weekend, I rediscovered Michael Bauer/@mihi_tr’s Reconcile CSV [code] service that builds an OpenRefine reconciliation service on top of a CSV file. One column in the CSV file contains a list of values that you want to reconcile (that is, fuzzy match) against, the other is a set of key identifier values associated with the matched against value.

Having already popped OpenRefine into a docker container, I thought I’d also explore dockerising Michael’s service: docker-reconciliation.

The default container uses a CSV file of UK MP names (current and previous) and returns their full title and an identifier used in the UK Parliament Members’ names data platform.

To run service in boot2docker:

  • docker run -p 8002:8000 --name mprecon -d psychemedia/docker-reconciliation
  • boot2docker ip to get the IP address the service is running on, eg 192.168.59.103
  • Test the service in your browser: http://192.168.59.103:8002/reconcile?query=David Cameroon

In OpenRefine, set the reconciliation service URL to http://192.168.59.103:8002/reconcile.

NOTE: I had thought I should be able to fire up linked OpenRefine and ReconcileCSV containers and address more conveniently, for example:

docker run --name openrefiner -p 3335:3333 --link mprecon:mprecon -d psychemedia/openrefine

and then setting something like http://mprecon:8000/reconcile as the reconciliation service endpoint, but that didn’t seem to work? Instead I had to use the endpoint routed to host (http://192.168.59.103:8002/reconcile).

I also added some command line parameters to the script so that you can fire up the container and reconcile against your own CSV file:

docker run -p 8003:8000 -v /path/to/:/tmp/import -e RECONFILE=myfile.csv -e SEARCHCOL=mysearchcol -e IDCOL=myidcol --name recon_mycsv -d psychemedia/docker-reconciliation

This loads in the file on your host computer at /path/to/myfule.csv using the column named mysearchcol for the search/fuzzy match values and the column named myidcol for the identifiers.

It struck me that I could then commit this customised container as a docker image, and push it to dockerhub as a tagged image. Permissions mean I can’t push to the original trusted/managed repository that builds containers from my github repo, but I can create a new dockerhub repository containing tagged images. For example:

docker commit recon_mycsv psychemedia/docker-reconciler:recon_mycsv
docker push psychemedia/docker-reconciler:recon_mycsv

This means I can collect a whole range of reconciliation services, each independently tagged, at psychemedia/docker-reconciler – tags.

So for example:

  • docker run --name reconcile_ukmps -p 8008:8000 -d psychemedia/docker-reconciler:ukmps_pastpresent runs a reconciliation service agains UK past and present MPs on port 8008;
  • docker run --name reconcile_westminster -p 8009:8000 -d psychemedia/docker-reconciler:westminster_constituency runs a reconciliation service against Westminster constituencies on port 8009.

In practice the current reconciliation service only seems to work well on small datasets, up to a few thousand lines, but nonetheless it can still be useful to be able to reconcile against such datasets. For larger files – such as the UK Companies House register, where we might use registered name for the search column and company number for the ID – it seems to take a while…! (For this latter example, a reconciliation service already exists at OpenCorporates.)

One problem with the approach I have taken is that the data file is mounted within the reconciliation server container. It would probably make more to sense have the RefineCSV container mount a data volume containing the CSV file, so that we can then upgrade the reconciliation server container once and then just link it to data containers. As it is, with the current model, we would have to rebuild each tagged image separately to update the reconciliation server they use.

Unfortunately, I don’t know of an easy way to package up data volume containers (an issue I’ve also come up against with database data stores). What I’d like to be able to do is have a simple “docker datahub” that I could push data volumes to, and then be able to say something like docker run -d --volumes-from psychemedia/reconciliation-data:westminster_constituency --name recon_constituencies psychemedia/reconciliation. Here, --volumes-from would look up data volume containers on something like registry.datahub.docker.com and psychemedia/reconciliation from registry.hub.docker.com.

So where’s all this going, and what next? First up, it would be useful to have an official Dockerfile that builds Michael’s Reconcile CSV server. (It would also be nice to see an example of a Python based reconciliation server – because I think I might be able to hack around with that! [UPDATE – there is one here that I forked here and dockerised here]) Secondly, I really need to find a way through the portable data volume container mess. Am I missing something obvious? Thirdly, the reconciliation server needs a bit of optimisation so it can work with larger files, a fast fuzzy match of some sort. (I also wonder whether a lite reconciliation wrapper for PostgreSQL would be useful that can leverage the PostgreSQL backend and fuzzy search plugin to publish a reconciliation service?)

And what’s the payoff? The ability to quickly fire up multiple reconciliation services against reference CSV documents.